#PreserveAfricaArchives

The Preservation Of Digital Born Heritage Should Not Be Overlooked - Says Johan Oomen, Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision

On 25 May 2021 at 10h00 GMT, Broadcast Media Africa (BMA), in partnership with Apricity Consulting, will be hosting a virtual forum, Auditing And Preparing Broadcast Archives For Digital Preservation In Africa.

Leading to the Online Forum, BMA conversed with Johan Oomen, Head of Research and Heritage Services at the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision and a researcher at the User-Centric Data Science group of the VU University Amsterdam. During the conversation, Oomen highlighted the contrast between the preservation of complex and dynamic digital-born materials and the digitisation of legacy collections. Both are the biggest challenge in the audio-visual archiving and preservation sector. He also added that securing funding was one other major challenge faced by the industry.

 Industry executives and professionals that would like to join the Forum on which will take place on Tuesday 25 May 2021 at 10h00 GMT can REGISTER HERE! 


Below is the excerpt of BMA's conversation with Johan Oomen:

BMA: What influenced you to get into the archiving and preservation field?

Johan: Initially, a passion for heritage and technology. And then it turned out the field is full of amazing people with loads of ideas and energy. I've been active in the field for two decades already! 


BMA: How has the audio-visual archiving and preservation sector changed in the past three years? What do you predict will happen in the next 5 to 10 years?

Johan: There's more emphasis on cloud-based storage solutions and galvanising artificial intelligence to extract metadata and meaning from files. In the future, it will be much easier to make connections between collections, galvanising the use of semantic web technologies and artificial intelligence. A big challenge will be how to track the provenance of the material, combating the spread of misinformation in the news ecosystem. 


BMA: What is the biggest challenge in the audio-visual archiving and preservation sector at the moment?

Johan: Retain knowledge about analogue media essential to digitising legacy collections as experts are retiring and the older hardware is getting more difficult to keep operational. Additionally, getting enough funding to digitise collections and secure rights so various user groups can access the material. On the other side of the spectrum: preserving complex and dynamic digital-born heritage such as web video and virtual reality. 


BMA: What do you think the best outcome for the online Forum on Auditing And Preparing Broadcast Archives For Digital Preservation In Africa would be? 

Johan: From experience, I know working together is essential to make informed decisions and access timely and accurate knowledge.   

About Johan Oomen: Johan is Head of Research and Heritage Services at the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision and a researcher at the User-Centric Data Science group of the VU University Amsterdam. Throughout his practice, Oomen works on initiatives that focus on providing access to digital heritage. Next to projects at Sound and Vision, Oomen works on international collaborative projects such as Time Machine, Europeana XX, CLARIAH, and ReTV. He has a background in information science, media studies and computer science, and his current research focuses on the relationship between participatory culture and institutional policy. Oomen has worked for the British Universities Film and Video Council and commercial broadcaster RTL Nederlands. He is a board member of the Europeana Foundation, the EUscreen Foundation, and the Public Spaces Foundation. Oomen is an advisor to the Amsterdam Fund for the Arts and the Dutch National Research Council for Cultural Heritage and co-chair of The Netherlands Heritage Network.

 





Share this post